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Baklava Palace – Middle Eastern Sweets


Baklava Palace - Middle Eastern Sweets - Khadda Market (DHA Karachi) (6)

Obvious lacking behind in taste and quality of available baklava in Pakistani market was reason enough for Baklava Palace to make their level best effort to make a product that could easily be matched with any imported baklava. Making it affordable was yet another reason for them to offer the products at rock bottom prices.

The owners and operators of Baklava Palace have only one objective in perspective: A satisfied customer will always come back for more. Our easily reachable shop, clean and comfortable environment, cooperative staff, reasonable prices, and eye-catching packaging are just a few of the many features topped by the taste of products that ensure their objective is reached.

Address: Shop # 6, Khadda Market, Khayaban-e-Shamsher, Phase-V, Near Saudi Consulate,Karachi, DHA Karachi. [Location Map]
Phone: 021-35248667
Website: http://baklavapalace.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/BaklavaPalace/

Baklava:

Although for most of us, the term Baklava is not new. But for those of us who are not familiar with the term Baklava, it is a rich sweet pastry made of multiple layers of phyllo dough. It is flaky in nature and is filled with nuts and is sweetened with sugar syrup or honey.

Owing to its ingredients, affordability of making Baklava was not within everyone’s reach historically. It was originally a dessert meant only for the wealthiest people in the country. With the vast development in means of transportation over past two centuries, trading became easier and more affordable. Dry fruits and other ingredients involved in making of Baklava became available to general public at relatively cheaper prices. As a result, Baklava became a general public item and bakers around Turkey, Greece and Middle East took the initiative of making and selling Baklava to general public.

History:

Although there is very little to no documented history of its origin, but the prevailing theory is that the Assyrians placed finely chopped nuts between several layers of very thin bread dough, then drizzled honey over the concoction and baked it in primitive stoves around 8th century B.C. There are many countries who claim that baklava first originated within their boundaries. While not every country’s claim could be held correct, there is one thing everyone claiming the prestigious heritage would agree upon; Baklava was not meant for general public. Rather it was something that only the wealthy and royals could enjoy. The cost and availability of raw materials for this pastry remained above the affordability of common people until recent history.

Many researchers agree to the point that baklava took its modern form and shape in the kitchens of Turkish Palace during Ottoman Empire reign. With the expansion of Ottoman Empire, the pastry was introduced in different parts of the world. Middle East got so extensively involved in developing the pastry that to the minds of modern people, baklava has become synonymous with Middle Eastern Sweets now.

Baklava Palace - Middle Eastern Sweets - Khadda Market (DHA Karachi) (1) Baklava Palace - Middle Eastern Sweets - Khadda Market (DHA Karachi) (2) Baklava Palace - Middle Eastern Sweets - Khadda Market (DHA Karachi) (3) Baklava Palace - Middle Eastern Sweets - Khadda Market (DHA Karachi) (4) Baklava Palace - Middle Eastern Sweets - Khadda Market (DHA Karachi) (5) Baklava Palace - Middle Eastern Sweets - Khadda Market (DHA Karachi) (7) Baklava Palace - Middle Eastern Sweets - Khadda Market (DHA Karachi) (8) Baklava Palace - Middle Eastern Sweets - Khadda Market (DHA Karachi) (9) Baklava Palace - Middle Eastern Sweets - Khadda Market (DHA Karachi) (10) Baklava Palace - Middle Eastern Sweets - Khadda Market (DHA Karachi) (11) Baklava Palace - Middle Eastern Sweets - Khadda Market (DHA Karachi) (12) Baklava Palace - Middle Eastern Sweets - Khadda Market (DHA Karachi) (13)

Comments (4)

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  1. aamina says:

    I found hair in a mithai from here which was made out of milk! I will never buy anything from this place, I thought it will be better than other sweet shops… but I was wrong! It certainly was not my hair because it was too small. DISGUSTING!!

  2. Amna says:

    The Baklava Palace in Deltons no doubt has a variety of Baklavas and mithai, however just a week back I bought the smallest packet of Milk Mithai that they offer. Just when I ate the third piece – THERE WAS A SHORT BLACK HAIR – that came in my mouth! It was horrible and I left the mithai instantly. I still have the remaining mithai in my fridge and as I will get time, I will go and insult them because they pose, wearing those plastic gloves, that everything is clean but actually this is what they hold inside. I don’t know who’s disgusting hair that was! What a Loser Place.

    Food is what we live on and if somebody does not take care of our needs in the best way then at least I don’t want to eat from this place ever again. In Pakistan, although Muslims are living but there is no sense at all of cleanliness! Others can enjoy a sweet with a hair in it, but sorry I can’t because not only should we respect food, we should also keep it clean from disgusting matter.

    • Ali Anwar says:

      Dear Amna, I can feel how much it would be disgusted if you discover an extra ingredient like this in any edible.

      I actually found out a human nail stuck in my gums out of a Donut from a re-known confectioners in Indianapolis, IN and the worst part was their response when i called to complain.

      Long story short, shit happens anywhere so it doesn’t have to be labelled strictly to a country or a nation. What do you think?

  3. A SAEED says:

    I Think if any of you had the pleasure of traveling to Istanbul and trying out the fresh Baklawa at Istaklal Street you will simply fall in love with it.

    However this shop at deltons I visited was a horrible experience and their sweets are not fresh at all …

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